Posted tagged ‘TIGTA’

Who Audits TIGTA?

November 22, 2013

By George W. Connelly

The Inspector General for Tax Administration, TIGTA, has been in the news a lot lately. In addition to tracking down misbehaving IRS employees and misbehaving representatives, an important role of this organization seems to be examining every aspect of the operation of the Internal Revenue Service and publishing a critical report about it. Lately, it seems that TIGTA has been publishing an average of two a week, virtually all of which have been critical of the performance of the Internal Revenue Service. Two recent ones, however, deserves some close examination and cause this writer to wonder if TIGTA may not be crossing the line of objectivity.

The first alleges that the IRS is not properly pursuing return preparers who have made mistakes in preparing returns where the earned income tax credit (EITC) has been claimed. Anyone familiar with the EITC knows there are several reasons why this criticism rings hollow. The first is a dirty little secret: EITC is an acronym for “welfare,” and has no place in the Internal Revenue Code. If our executive and legislative branches had any courage at all, they never would have put it there, but they recognize that parts of the American public view welfare as a “four letter word,” so it’s been tucked away in the Internal Revenue Code and dumped on the IRS to administer.

The second reason is well known to anyone who has attempted to navigate the labyrinth of rules relating to the application of the law and eligibility for this credit. It is like a scene out of an old Marks Brothers movie. A well-meaning and professional as most TIGTA agents I have come to know are, I would defy any of them to pass an EITC exam—applying it to several fact situations—without making an error.

The third point very simply is that the IRS does not set its own budget, but rather Congress does, and Congress has simply not allotted enough funds for each and every one of the functions that TIGTA doesn’t seem to think the IRS is doing well enough. The ideal solution—removing the EITC from the Internal Revenue Code, and charging some other agency with properly administering it, seems lost upon TIGTA, and as noted above seems to be an example of criticizing an already overburdened and embattled agency.

The other recent study was to the effect that the IRS is misinterpreting the law in such a manner that it “misses” penalties that should be applied to erroneous refund claims, tax returns, and other matters. Anyone who has represented people before the Internal Revenue Service or prepared returns will find this a mindboggling announcement in light of the fact that penalties seem to be applied during audits for little more than that sake of applying penalties, and unfortunately, judicial opinions about whether the penalty should have been applied in the first place often cannot be reconciled with one another when similar facts appear to be present. The reality exists that many of the penalties are not sustained, and TIGTA does not seem to take that element of the process into account.

Hopefully, TIGTA has not interpreted its role to be critic in residence rather than a source of constructive solutions for addressing the problems which exist in the IRS. It plays an indispensable role as monitor of the IRS, but perhaps it’s falling short when it omits important elements from its reports.

 

How Does IRS Police Its Own Lawyers?

July 15, 2013

By George W. Connelly

The IRS employs many lawyers and employees of the IRS Office of Chief Counsel are its principal legal staff who number 1560, of whom about 550 work in the IRS National Office in Washington, while the balance work in offices around the country.  They provide legal advice to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue and the local IRS offices, and they act as the lawyer for the Commissioner of Internal Revenue in all Tax Court cases.  In addition, some are specially designated to assist United States Attorneys in bankruptcy, summons enforcement and other civil cases.

In 1998, a Chief Counsel’s Professionalism Program was established, to ensure that the office fully complies with Treasury directives, and that all allegations of misconduct are promptly and thoroughly investigated.  All allegations or evidence of an employee’s serious or significant failure to comply with accepted standards must be referred to the Deputy Chief Counsel (Operations), and the most serious matters must be referred to the Office of the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA).

The IRS Office of Chief Counsel recently released reports on the subject of professionalism for the years 2009 through 2012, and the findings – which are broken between TIGTA and non-TIGTA cases – are worth noting.

The kinds of TIGTA cases include situations such as an employee lost a government laptop, misused the IDRS system to seek address information about an ex-spouse of the employee’s child, used Office of Chief Counsel letterhead to write a letter to a court on behalf of a personal friend who was being sentenced on tax-related charges, and one who used the Government computer to send emails on a private, non-work related matter which created the impression that they were acting in an official role.  The results of the investigations were as follows:

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Cases not substantiated

15

11

18

16

15

Employees separated before reviewcompleted

2 retired

5 resigned

0 retired

0 resigned

0 retired

0 resigned

  7

  0

Substantiated

15

28

15

27

25

Undetermined

  1

  1

  0

  0

  0

               TOTAL

38

40

33

50

40

Of those cases, the nature of the disciplinary action was reported for 2009-2011 as follows:

2009

2010

2011

2012

Counseling

Written-3

Oral-2

Written-1

Oral-8

Written-4

Oral-16

Written-1

Oral-20

Admonishment

  0

  2

  3

  1

Reprimand

  1

  1

  1

  1

Suspension

  1

  2

  3

  0

Removal

  0

  0

  0

  2

Downgrade

  0

  0

  0

  0

               TOTAL

14

27

  7

25

The reports also described the actions in non-TIGTA cases which fell in similar classifications.  The kinds of non-TIGTA cases which arose involved failing to file a proper tax return – overlooking interest income; failure to comply with deadlines imposed by the Tax Court; taking leave without authority; and a verbal altercation in an open office area involving racial terms and profanity.  In 2010, disciplinary action was taken in 97% of such cases, 100% in 2011, and 100% in 2012.

Given all the attention received for the Section 501(c)(4) situation, it is comforting to see that professionalism is not being ignored within the Office of Chief Counsel.  It will be interesting to see how all of the current allegations are dealt with in this framework.

Where Does the IRS Get Off Telling You How to Run Your Business?

November 22, 2011

By George W. Connelly

When the IRS audits a tax return involving a business, its agents invariably get involved in questions of recordkeeping and how transactions are conducted and recorded.  All too often, an IRS Examiner will suggest that a taxpayer’s records are not “adequate,” or that in some fashion the taxpayer is not operating in “a businesslike manner.”  This most often occurs in situations where the taxpayer is attempting to operate a ranch and has incurred losses, or claims that shareholder advances to the company should be recognized as bona fide loans rather than an investment of capital. (more…)

Will IRS Limit Exam’s Assertion of the Economic Substance Penalty? TIGTA Report Suggests Not.

December 31, 2010

Since codification of the economic substance doctrine in March 2010, taxpayers have expressed fears that IRS will assert the doctrine unpredictably, resulting in an in terrorem effect among taxpayers because of the lack of clear authorities interpreting the doctrine and the new 40% strict-liability penalty for falling on the wrong side of it.  To promote predictability in the exam processes, taxpayers have requested that Treasury or the IRS issue formal guidance instituting prescribed procedures to assert the penalty.  The government had declined these requests, but officials have promised queasy taxpayers that IRS will only assert the penalty after certain approvals.  For example, in September, LMSB Commissioner Heather Maloy issued a directive mandating that any assertion of the penalty during exam must be approved by the appropriate director of field operations.  Then, as reported by Tax Analysts, Associate Chief Counsel (Procedure and Administration) Deborah Butler said in October that Chief Counsel would review any notice of deficiency that applied the economic substance penalty before it was sent to the taxpayer.

(more…)

Who Audits the Internal Revenue Service?

September 24, 2010

By George W. Connelly

For most citizens of the United States, the thought of an IRS audit is probably scarier than a root canal or a colonoscopy without anesthesia.  As a result, people will be pleased to learn that the Internal Revenue Service is in fact “audited” itself, and sometimes doesn’t like the results of those audits.

The notion of auditing the IRS is probably surprising.  Most taxpayers know that from time to time their local media doubtless has someone who will find a horror story about a widow who really didn’t owe any taxes but is being harassed because of a mistake made by the IRS computer, and from time to time Congress occasionally exercises its oversight over IRS operations above and beyond asking the Commissioner what he’s doing about closing the “tax gap.”  But these contacts are sporadic, and there’s a question about their effectiveness.

(more…)


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